The world is shifting to pooling


I was in NYC last week:
I used UberPool I "pooled" the car with other people 80% of time.
I went to clubs where people enjoy together music.
I lived in AirBnB flat I "pooled" with people.
I took public transport, a public ferry, free bikes, "pooling" them with other people.
I visited museums opened to everybody, "pooling" it with other people.
I ate in restaurants, "pooling" good food with other people.
I bought vintage clothes in shops fed by people and where anybody can buy stuff.
I went to a farm market where producers sell stuff they product to a pool of buyers.
I prepared my trip using feedbacks of a pool of travelers and locals, TripAdvisor. I also got feedbacks and suggestions from friends.

What did I do alone?
Nothing. Walking maybe.

Our society is erasing not pooled activities and stuff.
Even private jets are no longer privates.

Thanks god we still have a house with furniture, a car and a desk with pictures of children at the office…
Well, not really:
Cars: in the US you have Zipcar, in France, Paris, we have Autolib working the same way than city bikes but for small electric cars.
House & furnitures: We start bringing AirBnB people in our houses. In the UK, London, renting a flat is expensive and most of people share flats. It’s definitely a first steps of more shared live spaces I think.
Desk: Shared desks and coworking spaces are more and more used…

What product & service don’t we pool or aren’t we about to pool?
Desktops, mobiles, clothes, notebooks, personal diaries, souvenirs and other personal stuff, things a bit dirty (e-cigarette, earplugs ...). Anything else?

The world is shifting to pooling.
To be precise, urban world is shifting to it.
Outside of cities, people still have their own stuff... for now.

If you start a business which is not about pooling, be careful.

If you find things that are not yet pooled, maybe there is a business to create.

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